RSHS Conducts DRAFT

While many football fans eagerly await the NFL Draft at the end of April, teachers at Reeds Spring High School just completed their own DRAFT. On Thursday, April 14, teachers selected students to be in their classrooms during Guided Study Hall for the next three weeks.

DRAFT stands for Developing Relationships And Focused Teaching. The program is designed to increase rigor and relevance in the classroom and improve the culture and climate of the school. The hope is that collaboration, communication, and early interventions ensure that no student falls through the cracks.

"The DRAFT is our unique process for selecting students to ensure they are getting the right help at the right time," said RSHS principal Dr. Isaac Sooter. "We leveraged the technology we have available to us to design a system that worked better for teachers and students and fit the needs we have in this building."

The DRAFT draft takes place in the morning before classes start. Teachers use Google Sheets, a web-based spreadsheet application to make the process easy and fun. They are able to select and sort 650 students in about 20 minutes. This peer collaboration helps to make sure every student gets placed with the teacher that will make the biggest impact over the next three weeks.

"That could be an intervention regarding ACT test prep," said RSHS assistant principal Brian Moler. "It could be a specific standard. It could be relationship-building time, to sit and down talk to a student about behavior, or to just get to know the students better."

Some students are excused from the DRAFT if they have good grades, attendance, and behavior. These students earn gold or silver cards that allow certain privileges during Guided Study Hall, like a reduced filter on their computer, open gym time, and access to the Media Lounge and Commons. This is earned time for the students to do what they need/want to do.  
"We strive to make this a great place to learn and a great place to work and the DRAFT plays an important role in the culture," Sooter said.
Published Print